ratak-monodosico

ratak-monodosico:

The MET has got some wonderful, fully illustrated textbooks that are available online for free! (X)

DOWNLOAD
  1. Art of the Islamic World
  2. The Art of Africa
  3. The Art of Ancient Egypt
  4. The Art of the Ancient Near East
  5. The Art of Renaissance Europe
  6. The Art of South and Southeast Asia
  7. The Arts of Korea
  8. Auguste Rodin: The Burghers of Calais
  9. Greek Art from Prehistoric to Classical
  10. Islamic Art and Geometric Design: Activities for Learning
  11. A Masterwork of Byzantine Art — The Story of David and Goliath
  12. Medieval Art
  13. Nature Within Walls: The Chinese Garden Court at The Metropolitan Museum of Art
  14. Roman Art
nymphamos-the-mad
nowyoukno:

Now You Know useful websites:
pipl.com - a search engine for finding people.
privnote.com - write a note to someone that
will self-destruct after they read it.
recipepuppy.com - search for recipes based
on the ingredients you have.
thefuckingweather.com - a more profane look
at the weather.
wolframalpha.com - a computational knowledge
engine.
wikirhymer.com - an online rhyming dictionary.
unlistmy.info - find out which websites store
data about you, and tell them to unlist your info.
thistothat.com - find out the best way to glue
this to that.
and daily facts here!

nowyoukno:

Now You Know useful websites:

The wealth of knowledge once reserved for the Ivy League Elite is now being released for free on the internet, power to the people!

In the beginning information traveled slow, knowledge was confined to a few buildings around the globe that are guarded by high entry fees and standardized test scores. The number of individuals who could gain access to information was kept to a short acceptance list while many were given an Access Denied.

But then like a swift kick in the face, the internet came along and changed everything! From media to commerce, the education system is no exception to the tornado that is the world wide web. Where once higher education was reserved for those who could pay the toll, the internet, in all its divinity has endowed us with a free higher education experience for all those who have a connection to the great and powerful Wi-Fi.

Here are just a few amazing online institutes that offer free college courses for the good people of planet earth, enjoy and never stop learning…

[Click linked article for gateway]

commondense

bana05:

infoneer-pulse:

Just in time for its first graduates, the University of the People, a tuition-free four-year-old online institution built to reach underserved students around the world, announced Thursday that it had received accreditation.

“This is every exciting, especially for the students who will graduate in April, with a degree from an accredited institution,” said Shai Reshef, the Israeli entrepreneur who invested millions of dollars to create the nonprofit university. “This has been the big question for anyone who thought about enrolling. We have 1.2 million supporters on Facebook, I think second only to Harvard, and every day, there is discussion about when we will be accredited.”

Now, with accreditation from the Distance Education and Training Council, a national accrediting group, Mr. Reshef said, the university will expand significantly. He expects to have 5,000 students by 2016.

» via The New York Times (Subscription may be required for some content)

Excellent!

Take college and university courses online completely free




In recent years massive open online courses (MOOCs) have become a trend in online education. The term was coined in 2008 by David Cormier, manager of web communications and innovations at the University of Prince Edward Island. The first MOOC was created the previous year, at Utah State University.

MOOCs are designed like college courses but are available to anyone anywhere in the world, at no cost. You do not receive a college credit, but you will receive a certificate of completion when you complete all coursework. The courses span dozens of subjects and are taught by some of the leaders in those fields. The courses are designed to be interesting, fun and rigorous; the courses are not just in science, and not just in English.

Coursera is perhaps the most well-known of the online education facilitators. Their latest numbers indicate that they have 17,000,000 enrollments from students representing 190 countries. There are 240,000
students in their most popular class. Coursera has over 400 courses in more than 20 categories, created by 85 Universities from 16 countries. Their courses are available in 12 different languages.

EdX is another non-profit course site created by founding partners Harvard and MIT and based in Cambridge, Massachusetts. EdX offers MOOCs and interactive online classes in subjects including law, history, science, engineering, business, social sciences, computer science, public health, and artificial intelligence (AI). It has partnerships with tertiary institutions in the U.S., Canada, Australia, the Netherlands, Sweden, Switzerland, Belgium, Germany, Hong Kong, India, Japan, China and Korea.

MIT has their own open courseware, where most of the materials used in the teaching of almost all of MIT’s subjects are available on the Web, free of charge. They have more than 2,000 courses available. Stanford also has their own online and open courses. These are great options if you prefer to work at your own pace, as compared to structured classes like those offered at Coursera and EdX.

European institutions are also getting in on the act. Germany-based Iversity offers courses in both English and German and the first courses went online in October this year. Future Learn is a subsidiary of the British Open University and is currently in its beta stage. It already has partnerships with universities across Britain, Ireland, Australia and New Zealand. The courses will begin this coming November.

For those looking to learn a language Duolingo offers completely free language education. If you’re interested in learning a valuable skill CodeAcademy teaches programming and coding in online, free and interactive lessons.

Other sites, like Open Culture, are not affiliated with tertiary institutions. On Open Culture, the editor finds the free courses and audio books on the web and hosts them on the site. The courses are audio & video and can be downloaded straight to a computer or mp3 player. 

This is by no means a complete list of all site and institutions that offer free online courses. http://www.mooc-list.com/ has many more listed.

- See more at: http://www.iflscience.com/technology/take-college-and-university-courses-online-completely-free?utm_content=buffer6bdd9&utm_source=buffer&utm_medium=facebook&utm_campaign=Buffer#sthash.L5RkuYR4.dpuf


Source: http://www.iflscience.com/technology/take-college-and-university-courses-online-completely-free?utm_content=buffer6bdd9&utm_source=buffer&utm_medium=facebook&utm_campaign=Buffer

neil-gaiman
theantidote:


Bowie’s 100 Must-Reads
The Age of American Unreason, Susan Jacoby (2008)The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, Junot Diaz (2007)The Coast of Utopia (trilogy), Tom Stoppard (2007) Teenage: The Creation of Youth 1875-1945, Jon Savage (2007)Fingersmith, Sarah Waters (2002)The Trial of Henry Kissinger, Christopher Hitchens (2001)Mr Wilson’s Cabinet of Wonder, Lawrence Weschler (1997)A People’s Tragedy: The Russian Revolution 1890-1924, Orlando Figes (1997)The Insult, Rupert Thomson (1996)Wonder Boys, Michael Chabon (1995)The Bird Artist, Howard Norman (1994)Kafka Was the Rage: A Greenwich Village Memoir, Anatole Broyard (1993)Beyond the Brillo Box: The Visual Arts in Post-Historical Perspective, Arthur C Danto (1992)Sexual Personae: Art and Decadence from Nefertiti to Emily Dickinson, Camille Paglia (1990)David Bomberg, Richard Cork (1988)Sweet Soul Music: Rhythm and Blues and the Southern Dream of Freedom, Peter Guralnick (1986)The Songlines, Bruce Chatwin (1986)Hawksmoor, Peter Ackroyd (1985)Nowhere to Run: The Story of Soul Music, Gerri Hirshey (1984)Nights at the Circus, Angela Carter (1984)Money, Martin Amis (1984)White Noise, Don DeLillo (1984)Flaubert’s Parrot, Julian Barnes (1984)The Life and Times of Little Richard, Charles White (1984)A People’s History of the United States, Howard Zinn (1980)A Confederacy of Dunces, John Kennedy Toole (1980)Interviews with Francis Bacon, David Sylvester (1980)Darkness at Noon, Arthur Koestler (1980)Earthly Powers, Anthony Burgess (1980)Raw, a “graphix magazine” (1980-91)Viz, magazine (1979 –)The Gnostic Gospels, Elaine Pagels (1979)Metropolitan Life, Fran Lebowitz (1978)In Between the Sheets, Ian McEwan (1978)Writers at Work: The Paris Review Interviews, ed Malcolm Cowley (1977)The Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind, Julian Jaynes (1976)Tales of Beatnik Glory, Ed Saunders (1975)Mystery Train, Greil Marcus (1975)Selected Poems, Frank O’Hara (1974)Before the Deluge: A Portrait of Berlin in the 1920s, Otto Friedrich (1972)n Bluebeard’s Castle: Some Notes Towards the Re-definition of Culture, George Steiner (1971) Octobriana and the Russian Underground, Peter Sadecky (1971)The Sound of the City: The Rise of Rock and Roll, Charlie Gillett(1970)The Quest for Christa T, Christa Wolf (1968)Awopbopaloobop Alopbamboom: The Golden Age of Rock, Nik Cohn (1968)The Master and Margarita, Mikhail Bulgakov (1967)Journey into the Whirlwind, Eugenia Ginzburg (1967)Last Exit to Brooklyn, Hubert Selby Jr (1966)In Cold Blood, Truman Capote (1965)City of Night, John Rechy (1965)Herzog, Saul Bellow (1964)Puckoon, Spike Milligan (1963)The American Way of Death, Jessica Mitford (1963)The Sailor Who Fell from Grace With the Sea, Yukio Mishima (1963)The Fire Next Time, James Baldwin (1963)A Clockwork Orange, Anthony Burgess (1962)Inside the Whale and Other Essays, George Orwell (1962)The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, Muriel Spark (1961)Private Eye, magazine (1961)On Having No Head: Zen and the Rediscovery of the Obvious, Douglas Harding (1961)Silence: Lectures and Writing, John Cage (1961)Strange People, Frank Edwards (1961)The Divided Self, RD Laing (1960)All the Emperor’s Horses, David Kidd (1960)Billy Liar, Keith Waterhouse (1959)The Leopard, Giuseppe di Lampedusa (1958)On the Road, Jack Kerouac (1957)The Hidden Persuaders, Vance Packard (1957)Room at the Top, John Braine (1957)A Grave for a Dolphin, Alberto Denti di Pirajno (1956)The Outsider, Colin Wilson (1956)Lolita, Vladimir Nabokov (1955)Nineteen Eighty-Four, George Orwell (1949)The Street, Ann Petry (1946)Black Boy, Richard Wright (1945)

(via kateoplis:)

theantidote:

Bowie’s 100 Must-Reads

The Age of American Unreason, Susan Jacoby (2008)
The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, Junot Diaz (2007)
The Coast of Utopia (trilogy), Tom Stoppard (2007) 
Teenage: The Creation of Youth 1875-1945, Jon Savage (2007)
Fingersmith, Sarah Waters (2002)
The Trial of Henry Kissinger, Christopher Hitchens (2001)
Mr Wilson’s Cabinet of Wonder, Lawrence Weschler (1997)
A People’s Tragedy: The Russian Revolution 1890-1924, Orlando Figes (1997)
The Insult, Rupert Thomson (1996)
Wonder Boys, Michael Chabon (1995)
The Bird Artist, Howard Norman (1994)
Kafka Was the Rage: A Greenwich Village Memoir, Anatole Broyard (1993)
Beyond the Brillo Box: The Visual Arts in Post-Historical Perspective, Arthur C Danto (1992)
Sexual Personae: Art and Decadence from Nefertiti to Emily Dickinson, Camille Paglia (1990)
David Bomberg, Richard Cork (1988)
Sweet Soul Music: Rhythm and Blues and the Southern Dream of Freedom, Peter Guralnick (1986)
The Songlines, Bruce Chatwin (1986)
Hawksmoor, Peter Ackroyd (1985)
Nowhere to Run: The Story of Soul Music, Gerri Hirshey (1984)
Nights at the Circus, Angela Carter (1984)
Money, Martin Amis (1984)
White Noise, Don DeLillo (1984)
Flaubert’s Parrot, Julian Barnes (1984)
The Life and Times of Little Richard, Charles White (1984)
A People’s History of the United States, Howard Zinn (1980)
A Confederacy of Dunces, John Kennedy Toole (1980)
Interviews with Francis Bacon, David Sylvester (1980)
Darkness at Noon, Arthur Koestler (1980)
Earthly Powers, Anthony Burgess (1980)
Raw, a “graphix magazine” (1980-91)
Viz, magazine (1979 –)
The Gnostic Gospels, Elaine Pagels (1979)
Metropolitan Life, Fran Lebowitz (1978)
In Between the Sheets, Ian McEwan (1978)
Writers at Work: The Paris Review Interviews, ed Malcolm Cowley (1977)
The Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind, Julian Jaynes (1976)
Tales of Beatnik Glory, Ed Saunders (1975)
Mystery Train, Greil Marcus (1975)
Selected Poems, Frank O’Hara (1974)
Before the Deluge: A Portrait of Berlin in the 1920s, Otto Friedrich (1972)
n Bluebeard’s Castle: Some Notes Towards the Re-definition of Culture, George Steiner (1971) Octobriana and the Russian Underground, Peter Sadecky (1971)
The Sound of the City: The Rise of Rock and Roll, Charlie Gillett(1970)
The Quest for Christa T, Christa Wolf (1968)
Awopbopaloobop Alopbamboom: The Golden Age of Rock, Nik Cohn (1968)
The Master and Margarita, Mikhail Bulgakov (1967)
Journey into the Whirlwind, Eugenia Ginzburg (1967)
Last Exit to Brooklyn, Hubert Selby Jr (1966)
In Cold Blood, Truman Capote (1965)
City of Night, John Rechy (1965)
Herzog, Saul Bellow (1964)
Puckoon, Spike Milligan (1963)
The American Way of Death, Jessica Mitford (1963)
The Sailor Who Fell from Grace With the Sea, Yukio Mishima (1963)
The Fire Next Time, James Baldwin (1963)
A Clockwork Orange, Anthony Burgess (1962)
Inside the Whale and Other Essays, George Orwell (1962)
The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, Muriel Spark (1961)
Private Eye, magazine (1961)
On Having No Head: Zen and the Rediscovery of the Obvious, Douglas Harding (1961)
Silence: Lectures and Writing, John Cage (1961)
Strange People, Frank Edwards (1961)
The Divided Self, RD Laing (1960)
All the Emperor’s Horses, David Kidd (1960)
Billy Liar, Keith Waterhouse (1959)
The Leopard, Giuseppe di Lampedusa (1958)
On the Road, Jack Kerouac (1957)
The Hidden Persuaders, Vance Packard (1957)
Room at the Top, John Braine (1957)
A Grave for a Dolphin, Alberto Denti di Pirajno (1956)
The Outsider, Colin Wilson (1956)
Lolita, Vladimir Nabokov (1955)
Nineteen Eighty-Four, George Orwell (1949)
The Street, Ann Petry (1946)
Black Boy, Richard Wright (1945)

(via kateoplis:)

nymphamos-the-mad
karma:

freeplanetickettonorthkorea:

the-beauty-of-words-blog:

debracondensed:

craigslisp:

milanys:

shamie:

libreoffice:

Over the years, Microsoft has started to become greedy with their Microsoft Office packages, previously, it was pre-included in Windows computers, and then,  they were separately sold. Now, they’re yearly subscriptions (like an Anti-virus)
It’s time to make a stand! (And no, don’t even pirate their software.)
LibreOffice - a software that’s very similar to Microsoft Office BUT THIS ONE’s FREE!
DOWNLOAD HERE

This has helped me big time during my time in college. Saved me big bucks & not getting into trouble by downloading a cracked Microsoft Office copy.
I highly recommend this to everyone. 

this is actually easier to use than Word tbh

Wow I was just considering to buy that Office 2013 package until I saw this post. Good stuff! +1

I literally JUST cracked and bought my year of Microsoft Office -_- But yeah they are just going really far from what they used to be.
Does libre office save in doc format though? I used to use another program that did but websites wouldn’t recognize it as doc :/

^ Yes, you can save as a .docx file & you can open files made through Word as well. 

Been using Libre Office/Open Office for years now. I have honestly not used Microsoft Office since 2003. Microsoft is on it’s way to collapse. Windows is going down the tubes in quality, and Open Source Operating systems are becoming more prevalent, they blew it with Windows Mobile, Xbox One looks like a total failure with a lot less power than the PS4. And now this with Microsoft Office. Use LibreOffice, save yourself money and use a product that is more often regularly maintained and updated than it’s Microsoft counterpart.

I’ve been usingit for years now.  It’s a great alternative to Microsoft Office.  Can save in nearly any major format.  Plus I find it easier to use than Microsoft Office.  Haven’t really used that since 03 when they had it in my high school computers. 

karma:

freeplanetickettonorthkorea:

the-beauty-of-words-blog:

debracondensed:

craigslisp:

milanys:

shamie:

libreoffice:

Over the years, Microsoft has started to become greedy with their Microsoft Office packages, previously, it was pre-included in Windows computers, and then,  they were separately sold. Now, they’re yearly subscriptions (like an Anti-virus)

It’s time to make a stand! (And no, don’t even pirate their software.)

LibreOffice - a software that’s very similar to Microsoft Office BUT THIS ONE’s FREE!

DOWNLOAD HERE

This has helped me big time during my time in college. Saved me big bucks & not getting into trouble by downloading a cracked Microsoft Office copy.

I highly recommend this to everyone. 

this is actually easier to use than Word tbh

Wow I was just considering to buy that Office 2013 package until I saw this post. Good stuff! +1

I literally JUST cracked and bought my year of Microsoft Office -_-
But yeah they are just going really far from what they used to be.

Does libre office save in doc format though? I used to use another program that did but websites wouldn’t recognize it as doc :/

^ Yes, you can save as a .docx file & you can open files made through Word as well. 

Been using Libre Office/Open Office for years now. I have honestly not used Microsoft Office since 2003. Microsoft is on it’s way to collapse. Windows is going down the tubes in quality, and Open Source Operating systems are becoming more prevalent, they blew it with Windows Mobile, Xbox One looks like a total failure with a lot less power than the PS4. And now this with Microsoft Office. Use LibreOffice, save yourself money and use a product that is more often regularly maintained and updated than it’s Microsoft counterpart.

I’ve been usingit for years now.  It’s a great alternative to Microsoft Office.  Can save in nearly any major format.  Plus I find it easier to use than Microsoft Office.  Haven’t really used that since 03 when they had it in my high school computers. 

elfboi

fayanora:

toriandrelativedimensionsinspace:

inunchartedwaters:

amplifytheworld:

referencesforartists:

brenanf999:

dontwantyourmoneysir:

anndruyan:

This is a summary of college only using two pictures; expensive as hell.

That’s my Sociology “book”. In fact what it is is a piece of paper with codes written on it to allow me to access an electronic version of a book. I was told by my professor that I could not buy any other paperback version, or use another code, so I was left with no option other than buying a piece of paper for over $200. Best part about all this is my professor wrote the books; there’s something hilariously sadistic about that. So I pretty much doled out $200 for a current edition of an online textbook that is no different than an older, paperback edition of the same book for $5; yeah, I checked. My mistake for listening to my professor.

This is why we download. 

Spreading this shit like nutella because goddamn textbooks are so expensive. 

not necessarily art related but as someone who couldn’t afford their textbooks this semester this is a godsend

REBLOGGING because after a little digging, I found my $200 textbook for free in PDF form.

friendly reminder that this exists since I know we’re all going back to college soon

reblogging for reference as much for myself as everyone else because fuck I have to pay rent this year unless I want to end up back and home and/or stuck on my parents’s forever

I knew college was a rip-off, but that is RIDICULOUS!!!